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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 348798, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/348798
Review Article

The Novel PKCθ from Benchtop to Clinic

1Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El Solh, Beirut, Lebanon
2Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Global University, P.O. Box 15-5085, Batrakiyye, Beirut, Lebanon
3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El Solh, Beirut, Lebanon

Received 1 August 2014; Accepted 12 January 2015

Academic Editor: Douglas C. Hooper

Copyright © 2015 Rouba Hage-Sleiman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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