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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 394917, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/394917
Review Article

Immunoregulation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biological Aspects and Clinical Applications

Mesenchymal Stem Cells Laboratory, Oncology Research Unit, Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, IMSS, Avenue Cuauhtémoc 330 Col. Doctores, 06720 Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Received 5 September 2014; Revised 20 November 2014; Accepted 1 December 2014

Academic Editor: Marco Antonio Velasco-Velázquez

Copyright © 2015 Marta E. Castro-Manrreza and Juan J. Montesinos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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