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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 478412, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/478412
Research Article

MBL2 Genotypes and Their Associations with MBL Levels and NICU Morbidity in a Cohort of Greek Neonates

1Department of Immunology & Histocompatibility, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Larissa, University of Thessaly, Biopolis 3, 41500 Larissa, Greece
2Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Larissa, University of Thessaly, Biopolis 3, 41500 Larissa, Greece
3Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, General Hospital of Nikea “Agios Panteleimon”, 11634 Athens, Greece
4Intensive Care Unit, Thriassion General Hospital of Eleusis, 19600 Athens, Greece

Received 7 October 2014; Revised 23 February 2015; Accepted 28 February 2015

Academic Editor: Eyad Elkord

Copyright © 2015 Matthaios Speletas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of MBL2 genotypes and their associations with MBL levels and various morbidities of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). One hundred and thirty-four (134) NICU (83 term and 51 preterm) and 150 healthy neonates were enrolled in the study. MBL2 genotype and MBL serum levels at birth were determined prospectively by PCR-RFLP-sequencing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. NICU neonates displayed significantly lower MBL serum levels compared to healthy ones. MBL deficiency, defined as the low MBL2 expression group (XA/O and O/O), was significantly associated with an increased risk of respiratory morbidity, especially transient tachypnea of the newborn and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Moreover, an increase of 100 ng/mL of serum MBL levels decreases by 5% the risk of total respiratory morbidity and by 7% the risk of RDS, after correction for prematurity and sex and regardless of the presence of infections. Our study further supports the notion that neonates with MBL deficiency and low MBL serum levels at birth may be at higher risk of developing severe respiratory complications.