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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 489821, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/489821
Review Article

How the Intricate Interaction among Toll-Like Receptors, Microbiota, and Intestinal Immunity Can Influence Gastrointestinal Pathology

Department of Medical Science, Institute of Internal Medicine, “A. Gemelli” University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Largo A. Gemelli, 8-00168 Rome, Italy

Received 30 April 2014; Revised 1 October 2014; Accepted 27 October 2014

Academic Editor: Ciriaco A. Piccirillo

Copyright © 2015 Simona Frosali et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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