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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 614758, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/614758
Review Article

Microbiome and Asthma: What Have Experimental Models Already Taught Us?

Clinical Immunology and Allergy Division, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, 01454-010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 9 May 2015; Accepted 2 July 2015

Academic Editor: Kurt Blaser

Copyright © 2015 R. Bonamichi-Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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