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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 747543, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/747543
Review Article

Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells

1Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA

Received 5 April 2015; Accepted 24 June 2015

Academic Editor: Clelia M. Riera

Copyright © 2015 Jonathan Kevin Sia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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