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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 838035, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/838035
Review Article

Trans-Species Polymorphism in Immune Genes: General Pattern or MHC-Restricted Phenomenon?

Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Viničná 7, 128 44 Praha, Czech Republic

Received 25 March 2015; Accepted 4 May 2015

Academic Editor: Nejat K. Egilmez

Copyright © 2015 Martin Těšický and Michal Vinkler. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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