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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 2395645, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2395645
Review Article

Effects of Invariant NKT Cells on Parasite Infections and Hygiene Hypothesis

1Key Laboratory of National Health and Family Planning Commission on Parasitic Disease Control and Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory on Parasite and Vector Control, Jiangsu Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214064, China
2Autoimmunity and Tolerance Laboratory, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 22 May 2016; Accepted 20 June 2016

Academic Editor: Anil Shanker

Copyright © 2016 Jun-Qi Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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