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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3845247, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3845247
Research Article

The Mannose Receptor Is Involved in the Phagocytosis of Mycobacteria-Induced Apoptotic Cells

Departamento de Inmunología, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México City, DF, Mexico

Received 21 October 2015; Revised 18 May 2016; Accepted 24 May 2016

Academic Editor: Paola Nistico

Copyright © 2016 Teresa Garcia-Aguilar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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