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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 4857869, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4857869
Research Article

CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model

Department of R&D, Immunomic Therapeutics, Inc. (ITI), Rockville, MD 20850, USA

Received 29 January 2016; Revised 23 March 2016; Accepted 27 March 2016

Academic Editor: Ethan M. Shevach

Copyright © 2016 Yan Su et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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