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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4962351, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4962351
Research Article

Neuroprotective Activity of ()-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

1Animal Biosafety Level III Laboratory at the Center for Animal Experiment, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071, China
2Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
3State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China

Received 20 January 2016; Revised 15 March 2016; Accepted 17 March 2016

Academic Editor: Oscar Bottasso

Copyright © 2016 Jin-Biao Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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