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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 5358272, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5358272
Review Article

Posttranslational Modifications and the Immunogenicity of Biotherapeutics

Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical & Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

Received 26 January 2016; Accepted 20 March 2016

Academic Editor: Leslie A. Khawli

Copyright © 2016 Roy Jefferis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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