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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 6762343, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6762343
Review Article

Roles of Zinc Signaling in the Immune System

1Osteoimmunology, Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum, Berlin, Germany
2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, Japan

Received 1 July 2016; Accepted 11 August 2016

Academic Editor: Manoj K. Mishra

Copyright © 2016 Shintaro Hojyo and Toshiyuki Fukada. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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