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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 7121580, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7121580
Review Article

Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Common Traits in Immune Regulation

Central Tuberculosis Research Institute, Yauza Alley 2, Moscow 107564, Russia

Received 25 February 2016; Accepted 8 May 2016

Academic Editor: Moisés E. Bauer

Copyright © 2016 Irina Lyadova Vladimirovna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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