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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 8163803, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8163803
Review Article

IgE-Related Chronic Diseases and Anti-IgE-Based Treatments

Biochemistry Unit, Biomedicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Casanova 143, 08036 Barcelona, Spain

Received 23 September 2016; Accepted 2 November 2016

Academic Editor: Margarete D. Bagatini

Copyright © 2016 Arnau Navinés-Ferrer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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