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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 8249015, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8249015
Review Article

The Toll of Vascular Insufficiency: Implications for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, Suite A1011, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

Received 9 October 2015; Revised 19 January 2016; Accepted 21 January 2016

Academic Editor: Peirong Jiao

Copyright © 2016 Jun Xu and Ulka Sachdev. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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