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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 9170162, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9170162
Research Article

Colonic Mucosal Epigenome and Microbiome Development in Children and Adolescents

1Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Department of Pathology & Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
4Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA
5Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
6Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway
7Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
8Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
9USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 18 August 2015; Revised 12 January 2016; Accepted 17 January 2016

Academic Editor: Kurt Blaser

Copyright © 2016 R. Alan Harris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Epigenetic and microbiome changes during pediatric development have been implicated as important elements in the developmental origins of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are linked to early onset colorectal cancer (CRC). Colonic mucosal samples from 22 control children between 3.5 and 17.5 years of age were studied by Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips and, in 10 cases, by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Intercalating age-specific DNA methylation and microbiome changes were identified, which may have significant translational relevance in the developmental origins of IBD and CRC.