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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9238290, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9238290
Review Article

Recent Advances of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Central Nervous System Disorders

1Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
2Brain Research Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Received 15 June 2016; Accepted 2 August 2016

Academic Editor: Menaka C. Thounaojam

Copyright © 2016 Keren Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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