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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 9345495, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9345495
Research Article

Thrombin Cleavage of Osteopontin Modulates Its Activities in Human Cells In Vitro and Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis In Vivo

1Department of Health Sciences and Interdisciplinary Research Center of Autoimmune Diseases (IRCAD), “A. Avogadro” University of Piemonte Orientale (UPO), 28100 Novara, Italy
2Department of Drug Science and Technology, University of Torino, 10125 Torino, Italy
3Biocenter, Division for Experimental Pathophysiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Autoimmunity, Medical University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
4Department of Translational Medicine, Neurology Unit, “A. Avogadro” UPO, 28100 Novara, Italy

Received 20 May 2016; Accepted 8 June 2016

Academic Editor: Yao Yao

Copyright © 2016 Elena Boggio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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