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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 2738784, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2738784
Research Article

Comparison between the HLA-B58 : 01 Allele and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Chromosome 6 for Prediction of Allopurinol-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions

1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Phayao, Thailand
3Pharmacy Unit, Udon Thani Hospital, Udon Thani, Thailand
4Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
5Pharmacy Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
6Department of Pathology, Division of Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
7Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Somdech Phra Debaratana Medical Center (SDMC), Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
8Pharmacy Unit, Police General Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand
9Pharmacy Department, Khon Kaen Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand

Correspondence should be addressed to Wichittra Tassaneeyakul; moc.liamg@lukayeenassat.arttihciw

Received 24 July 2017; Accepted 8 November 2017; Published 17 December 2017

Academic Editor: Ethan M. Shevach

Copyright © 2017 Niwat Saksit et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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