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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2860867, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2860867
Research Article

B-CD8+ T Cell Interactions in the Anti-Idiotypic Response against a Self-Antibody

1Tumor Immunology Direction, Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana, Cuba
2Systems Biology Direction, Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana, Cuba
3Immunobiology Laboratory, Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, New York, NY, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Ana María Hernández; uc.dls.mic@atina

Received 4 August 2016; Revised 18 November 2016; Accepted 20 December 2016; Published 9 April 2017

Academic Editor: Gabriella Sarmay

Copyright © 2017 Darel Martínez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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