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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 4069260, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4069260
Research Article

Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells

1INAGEN Aps., Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
2Laboratory for Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
3Section for Life Science and Bioengineering Innovation, Veterinary Institute, The Danish Technical University, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Thomas N. Kledal; kd.utd.tev@lknt and Mette M. Rosenkilde; kd.uk.dnus@edliknesor

Received 9 November 2016; Accepted 27 December 2016; Published 30 January 2017

Academic Editor: Abel Viejo-Borbolla

Copyright © 2017 Katja Spiess et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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