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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 9830701, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9830701
Research Article

Development of Safe and Non-Self-Immunogenic Mucosal Adjuvant by Recombinant Fusion of Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit with Protein Transduction Domain

1Laboratory Science Division, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea
2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea
3Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
4Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS-INSERM-University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Valbonne, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Man Ki Song; tni.ivi@gnoskm

Received 21 July 2017; Revised 3 December 2017; Accepted 10 December 2017; Published 7 March 2018

Academic Editor: Ethan M. Shevach

Copyright © 2018 Byoung-Shik Shim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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