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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2019, Article ID 2121849, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2121849
Research Article

Mesangial Cells Exhibit Features of Antigen-Presenting Cells and Activate CD4+ T Cell Responses

1Department of Nephrology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China
2Department of Nephrology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Kidney Diseases, Beijing, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Zhe Feng; moc.621@5204_ehzehz and Xiangmei Chen; moc.621@103nehcmx

Received 6 September 2018; Revised 1 April 2019; Accepted 14 May 2019; Published 17 June 2019

Academic Editor: Alexandre Keller

Copyright © 2019 Hongyu Yu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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