Journal of Immunology Research

Immunotherapy in the Treatment of Human Solid Tumors: Basic and Translational Aspects


Status
Published

1University of Genova, Genova, Italy

2Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, USA

3Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France

4Istituto G Gaslini, Genova, Italy


Immunotherapy in the Treatment of Human Solid Tumors: Basic and Translational Aspects

Description

In the last two decades important advancements in the treatment of hematological malignancies have led to significant increases in patients’ survival. In sharp contrast, few substantial therapeutic progresses have been made in the treatment of solid tumors, which remain the most frequent cancers in industrialized countries. Currently, available therapies to control solid tumor growth include surgery, when applicable, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting of molecular pathways used by cancer cells and/or tumor-associated vasculature. In a relevant number of cases combination therapies induce a rapid but however short-lasting tumor regression. Time has come to improve knowledge of the mechanisms allowing tumor survival in the host and discovering novel strategies that, by supporting currently used therapeutic protocols, warrant long-term remission or possibly cure the disease. Therapies based on nanotechnology delivery platforms, like liposomes containing antitumor compounds, can improve selective toxicity against cancer cells while reducing, if not minimizing side effects. Due to the peculiar permeability of tumor vasculature, liposomes preferentially accumulate into tumor interstitial spaces. Moreover, compounds concentration increase several-fold by conjugating liposomes with molecules such as antibodies or fragments thereof that selectively target tumor-associated ligands.

A more durable tumor control can be obtained with interventions aimed at strengthening or restoring the antitumor immunity. Responses have been documented in patients with solid tumors who received therapies that interfere with the CTLA-4/B7s and/or PD1/PD-Ls axes, critical checkpoints that regulate the duration and amplitude of T CD8+ and NK effector functions. Results can be achieved also when the adverse tumor microenvironment is converted into a milieu favorable for the recruitment, survival, and function of immune effectors. Efforts are currently ongoing to overcome the immunosuppression mediated by immunoregulatory cytokines, including TGF-β macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and treg. Additional interventions focus on the chemokine/chemokine receptor repertoire, usually hijacked in tumor tissues, to promote the migration of suitable immune effectors, either endogenous or infused in adoptive immunotherapies. Finally, combining adoptive immunotherapy modalities, like NK cells and T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR), may result in synergistic therapeutic opportunities.

We invite investigators to contribute with original papers as well as reviews describing recent findings in the field of basic and translational immunology against solid tumors.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Innovative immune-mediated therapies: liposomes-based strategies to deliver anticancer compounds to novel tumor- and tumor vasculature-associated antigens
  • NK cells and T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR)
  • Novel immunomodulatory pathways enhancing the responses of T cells and innate effectors
  • Mechanisms and strategies to overcome the immunosuppression (cell-to-cell contacts and soluble factors) mediated by tumor cells, tumor associated leucocytes, and stromal cells
  • Chemokines and chemokine receptors that influence the migratory capabilities of endogenous or infused immune effectors

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2016
  • - Article ID 7853028
  • - Editorial

Immunotherapy in the Treatment of Human Solid Tumors: Basic and Translational Aspects

D. Olive | B. Savoldo | ... | R. Castriconi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2016
  • - Article ID 4684268
  • - Review Article

NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

Claudia Cantoni | Leticia Huergo-Zapico | ... | Massimo Vitale
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2016
  • - Article ID 3142365
  • - Review Article

Involvement of HMGB1 in Resistance to Tumor Vessel-Targeted, Monoclonal Antibody-Based Immunotherapy

Vito Pistoia | Annalisa Pezzolo
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2016
  • - Article ID 4683607
  • - Review Article

Immune Checkpoint Modulators: An Emerging Antiglioma Armamentarium

Eileen S. Kim | Jennifer E. Kim | ... | Michael Lim
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 968212
  • - Review Article

Clinical Options in Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: An Updated Review

Roberta Fedele | Massimo Martino | ... | Fortunato Morabito
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 902137
  • - Research Article

Serum CEACAM1 Elevation Correlates with Melanoma Progression and Failure to Respond to Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

R. Ortenberg | S. Sapoznik | ... | G. Markel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 482089
  • - Research Article

In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison of Lymphocytes Transduced with a Human CD16 or with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Reveals Potential Off-Target Interactions due to the IgG2 CH2-CH3 CAR-Spacer

Béatrice Clémenceau | Sandrine Valsesia-Wittmann | ... | Henri Vié
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 630287
  • - Research Article

Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

Cagri Sakalar | Suparna Mazumder | ... | Vincent K. Tuohy
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 158038
  • - Review Article

Immune Checkpoint Modulation in Colorectal Cancer: What’s New and What to Expect

Julie Jacobs | Evelien Smits | ... | Vanessa Deschoolmeester
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 789136
  • - Research Article

Gene Expression Profile of Dendritic Cell-Tumor Cell Hybrids Determined by Microarrays and Its Implications for Cancer Immunotherapy

Jens Dannull | Chunrui Tan | ... | Walter T. Lee
Journal of Immunology Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate40%
Submission to final decision61 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore5.100
Impact Factor3.327
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