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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2011, Article ID 971618, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/971618
Research Article

Potent Inhibition of Acid Ceramidase by Novel B-13 Analogues

Institut für Chemie, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Str 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany

Received 28 July 2010; Revised 1 October 2010; Accepted 26 October 2010

Academic Editor: Angel Catala

Copyright © 2011 Denny Proksch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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