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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2012, Article ID 601796, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/601796
Research Article

Paraoxonase-1 55 LL Genotype Is Associated with No ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and with High Levels of Myoglobin

1Advanced Technology Centre for Aging Research, Italian National Research Centre on Aging (INRCA), INRCA-IRCCS, 60121 Ancona, Italy
2Centre of Biostatistics, Italian National Research Centre on Aging (INRCA), 60121 Ancona, Italy
3Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK
4Department of Experimental Pathology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
5Interdipartimental Centre “L. Galvani”, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
6Department of Cardiology (CCU), Italian National Research Centre on Aging (INRCA), 60121 Ancona, Italy

Received 30 November 2011; Accepted 19 January 2012

Academic Editor: Mira Rosenblat

Copyright © 2012 Francesca Marchegiani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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