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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2012, Article ID 610937, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/610937
Research Article

Solubilization and Humanization of Paraoxonase-1

1Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2Physiology and Immunology Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010, USA
3Department of Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Received 12 January 2012; Revised 26 March 2012; Accepted 26 March 2012

Academic Editor: Alejandro Gugliucci

Copyright © 2012 Mohosin Sarkar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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