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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2012, Article ID 762560, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/762560
Research Article

Increased Levels of Human Carotid Lesion Linoleic Acid Hydroperoxide in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Patients Is Inversely Correlated with Serum HDL and Paraoxonase 1 Activity

1Oxidative Stress Research Laboratory, Migal-Galilee Technology Center and Tel Hai College, P.O. Box 831, Kiryat Shmona 11016, Israel
2Rappaport Family Institute for Research in the Medical Sciences, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa 31096, Israel
3Department of Vascular Surgery, Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel

Received 29 December 2011; Revised 12 February 2012; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Mira Rosenblat

Copyright © 2012 Elad Cohen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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