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References

  1. B. S. Peskin, “Why fish oil fails: a comprehensive 21st century lipids-based physiologic analysis,” Journal of Lipids, vol. 2014, Article ID 495761, 15 pages, 2014.
Journal of Lipids
Volume 2014, Article ID 495761, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/495761
Review Article

Why Fish Oil Fails: A Comprehensive 21st Century Lipids-Based Physiologic Analysis

The International PEO Society, P.O. Box 56507, Houston, TX 77256, USA

Received 26 September 2013; Revised 10 November 2013; Accepted 11 November 2013; Published 16 January 2014

Academic Editor: Angel Catalá

Copyright © 2014 B. S. Peskin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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