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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2009, Article ID 640215, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/640215
Research Article

Growth Rate Potential of Juvenile Sockeye Salmon in Warmer and Cooler Years on the Eastern Bering Sea Shelf

1NOAA, NMFS, AFSC, Auke Bay Laboratories, Ted Stevens Marine Research Institute, 17109 Point Lena Loop Road, Juneau, AK 99801, USA
2Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, 3190 Hammond Bay Road, Nanaimo, BC, Canada V9T 6N7
3Department of Biology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3020, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3N5

Received 11 February 2009; Accepted 18 May 2009

Academic Editor: Jakov Dulčić

Copyright © 2009 Edward V. Farley Jr. and Marc Trudel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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