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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 185890, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/185890
Research Article

Tradeoffs to Thermal Acclimation: Energetics and Reproduction of a Reef Coral with Heat Tolerant Symbiodinium Type-D

1Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia
2Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville Mail Centre, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia

Received 9 November 2010; Revised 17 February 2011; Accepted 7 March 2011

Academic Editor: Horst Felbeck

Copyright © 2011 Alison M. Jones and Ray Berkelmans. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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