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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 504651, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/504651
Research Article

Scenarios for Knowledge Integration: Exploring Ecotourism Futures in Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea

1CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences Division and Climate Adaptation Flagship, Private Mail Bag, Aitkenvale QLD 4814, Australia
2CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences Division and Climate Adaptation Flagship, GPO Box 2583, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia
3Asia-Pacific Field Division, Pacific Island Program, Conservation International, 211 Alotau, Papua New Guinea

Received 21 April 2010; Revised 16 August 2010; Accepted 5 October 2010

Academic Editor: Judith D. Lemus

Copyright © 2011 E. L. Bohensky et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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