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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 492308, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/492308
Research Article

Kelp Forests versus Urchin Barrens: Alternate Stable States and Their Effect on Sea Otter Prey Quality in the Aleutian Islands

1School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 905 N. Koyukuk Drive, 245 O’Neill Building, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
2Global Undersea Research Unit, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 905 N. Koyukuk Drive, 217 O’Neill Building, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA

Received 11 August 2011; Revised 28 November 2011; Accepted 29 November 2011

Academic Editor: Andrew McMinn

Copyright © 2012 Nathan L. Stewart and Brenda Konar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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