Table 2: Individual prey quality values from remnant kelp forest and urchin barrens sampled in this study and from locations elsewhere in the sea otters range. Values indicate the potential energy density per individual species (kcal·g−1 wet mass) ± 1 S.D. Prey species include Strongylocentrotus polyacanthus, Mytilus trossulus, and Fusitriton oregonensis. S. polyacanthus is most common in the Aleutians but is compared to S. droebachiensis from other regions in this table given their similarity in mitochondrial DNA analysis [78]. Current population trends were referenced in Estes et al. 2005 [17] (C. and W. Aleut., AK: central and western Aleutians, AK), Gill et al. 2009 [75] (KBay, AK: Kachemak Bay, AK), Bodkin et al. 2003 [76] (GBNP, AK; Glacier Bay, AK), Estes et al. 2003 [21] (MBNMS, CA: Monterey Bay, CA), and Tinker et al. 2008 [77] (SNI, CA: San Nicholas Is., CA). Sources of regional prey values are (A) this study; (B) Stewart and Konar, unpublished data; and (C) Oftedal et al. 2007. Sea otter population status from each location is either (D) declining, (I) increasing, or (S) stable. NP: Not present.

LocationSourceSea otter pop. status Prey Species
Strongyloc.MytilusFustitrit.

C., W. Aleut., AK
 kelp forestAD 0 . 2 1 ± 0 . 0 2 0 . 4 1 ± 0 . 0 6 1 . 3 6 ± 0 . 0 6
 urchin barrenAD 0 . 1 4 ± 0 . 0 8 0 . 4 7 ± 0 . 0 4 1 . 4 1 ± 0 . 0 3
KBay, AKBI 0 . 2 6 ± 0 . 0 6 0 . 3 6 ± 0 . 0 2 1 . 0 9 ± 0 . 0 8
GBNP, AKCI 0 . 2 4 ± 0 . 0 4 0 . 3 3 ± 0 . 0 6 1 . 1 1 ± 0 . 2 3
MBNMS, CACS 0 . 3 9 ± 0 . 0 4 0 . 5 5 ± 0 . 0 4 NP