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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 597383, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/597383
Research Article

Aerial Survey as a Tool to Estimate Abundance and Describe Distribution of a Carcharhinid Species, the Lemon Shark, Negaprion brevirostris

1School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AT, UK
2Bimini Biological Field Station, 15 Elizabeth Drive, South Bimini, Bahamas
3University of Windsor, Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, Canada N9B 3P4

Received 23 April 2013; Revised 6 August 2013; Accepted 2 September 2013

Academic Editor: Susumu Ohtsuka

Copyright © 2013 S. T. Kessel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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