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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2017, Article ID 7097965, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7097965
Research Article

Satellite Tracking and Site Fidelity of Short Ocean Sunfish, Mola ramsayi, in the Galapagos Islands

1California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA, USA
2Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Galapagos Science Center, Quito, Ecuador
3University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, USA
4Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, USA
5Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, USA
6Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador, Portoviejo, Manabí, Ecuador

Correspondence should be addressed to Tierney M. Thys; moc.liamg@syhtyenreit

Received 29 January 2017; Accepted 4 April 2017; Published 4 May 2017

Academic Editor: Jakov Dulčić

Copyright © 2017 Tierney M. Thys et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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