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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 643857, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/643857
Review Article

Translesion Synthesis Polymerases in the Prevention and Promotion of Carcinogenesis

1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
2Department of Medicine (Medical Oncology), James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
3Clinical and Translational Research, 505 S. Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA

Received 16 June 2010; Accepted 13 August 2010

Academic Editor: Ashis Basu

Copyright © 2010 L. Jay Stallons and W. Glenn McGregor. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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