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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 725071, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/725071
Review Article

Prevention of Mutation, Cancer, and Other Age-Associated Diseases by Optimizing Micronutrient Intake

Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, 5700 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Oakland, CA 94609, USA

Received 8 June 2010; Accepted 30 July 2010

Academic Editor: Ashis Basu

Copyright © 2010 Bruce N. Ames. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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