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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2010, Article ID 872180, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/872180
Research Article

Elevated Levels of DNA Strand Breaks Induced by a Base Analog in the Human Cell Line with the P32T ITPA Variant

1Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6805, USA
2Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064, Russia
3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6025, USA

Received 26 April 2010; Accepted 11 July 2010

Academic Editor: Ashis Basu

Copyright © 2010 Irina S.-R. Waisertreiger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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