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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2010, Article ID 981487, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/981487
Review Article

Regulation of HuR by DNA Damage Response Kinases

1Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, NIA-IRP, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
2Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710, Republic of Korea

Received 15 April 2010; Accepted 17 May 2010

Academic Editor: Ashis Basu

Copyright © 2010 Hyeon Ho Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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