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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2012, Article ID 140601, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/140601
Review Article

Unwinding and Rewinding: Double Faces of Helicase?

Department of Biochemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E5

Received 12 April 2012; Accepted 28 May 2012

Academic Editor: Grigory Dianov

Copyright © 2012 Yuliang Wu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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