Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Research Article
Journal of Nucleic Acids
VolumeĀ 2014, Article IDĀ 412942, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/412942
Erratum

Erratum to “Analysis of Nucleotide Sequences of the 16S rRNA Gene of Novel Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Feces of Human and Bali Cattle”

Department of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Udayana University, Jalan P.B. Sudirman, Denpasar, Bali 80232, Indonesia

Received 8 May 2014; Revised 30 July 2014; Accepted 30 July 2014; Published 29 December 2014

Copyright © 2014 I Wayan Suardana. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


In the paper titled “Analysis of Nucleotide Sequences of the 16S rRNA Gene of Novel Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Feces of Human and Bali Cattle,” according to my data, there are too many nucleotides of both S. dysenteriae and E. coli O26:H11 different from the other strains. So logically both strains are placed as outgroup. This fact is difficult to explain from the point of view of the evolution. Taking this in mind I submit the erratum, that is, Figures 1 and 2 and Table 1 without Shigella dysenteriae and E. coli O26:H11 as a comparison. It is also completely concerned with the correction of some words in the specified paragraph. Figures 1 and 2 and Table 1 are corrected here.

Table 1: Similarity analysis and nucleotides different among 16S rRNA genes using PHYDIT program.
Figure 1: Nucleotides sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of the isolates E. coli SM-25(1) and E. coli KL-48(2) among nucleotides sequence of those available in databanks. Data indicated the position of nucleotides different among isolates and identical data for all isolates are not shown.
Figure 2: Phylogenetic tree was constructed using neighbor-joining algorithm [14] of nucleotides sequence of 16S rRNA gene. The number in the branch of phylogram indicates bootstrap value (%) by 1000-replication multiple and scale indicates one per 1000 substitutions of nucleotides sequence of 16S rRNA gene.

Paragraph 4 of Results and Discussion is corrected as follows. The analysis of similarity or nucleotides different among E. coli SM-25(1) and KL-48(2) strains were studied against some strains of E. coli, that is, E. coli Sakai (BA000007), E. coli EDL 933 (AE005174), E. coli O104:H4 (AFOB02000112), E. coli O111:H-(GU237022), E. coli O121:H19 (JASV01000004), and E. coli ATCC 43894 as a bacterial control. The similarity analysis was also conducted on some strains of non-E. coli, that is, Aeromonas sp. (FM957460), Vibrio sp. (FM957459), Shigella sonnei (FR870445), Streptomyces sp. (AJ391832), and Bacillus sp. (AB851799) that are summarized in Table 1.

Paragraph 5 of Results and Discussion is corrected as follows. The summary of the 16S rRNA similarity analysis in Table 1 showed that E. coli KL-48(2) that originated from human feces has nucleotide similarity to 16S rRNA gene closely against some strains. These strains, that is, E. coli SM-25(1), E. coli 121:H19, E. coli ATCC 43894, E. coli Sakai, E. coli EDL 933, Shigella sonnei, E. coli O111:H-, and E. coli O104:H4, are as high as 99.64, 99.56, 99.42, 99.35, 99.35, 99.35, 99.20, and 99.13%, respectively. Furthermore, E. coli SM-25(1) that originated from cattle feces also has high nucleotides similarity to the data of 16S rRNA that are available in GenBank also. It has nucleotides similarity to Shigella sonnei, E. coli O121:H19, E. coli O104:H4, E. coli ATCC 43894, E. coli Sakai, and E. coli EDL 933 as high as 99.71, 99.64, 99.49, 99.20, 99.13, and 99.13%, respectively. On the other hand, both strains showed percentage of nucleotide similarity distinctly to Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Aeromonas, and Vibrio sp.

Paragraph 11 of Results and Discussion is corrected as follows. Phylogenetic tree in Figure 2 showed that the E. coli KL-48(2) and SM-25(1) made close clade with some strains of pathogenic E. coli. On the contrary, both strains also showed distinct clade against some strains that are available in databank. Some of those strains are Streptomyces sp. isolated from Yogyakarta, Bacillus sp. isolated from Jepara, and Vibrio sp. and Aeromonas sp. isolated from Lampung. As a result, both strains are proved to be a strain of pathogenic E. coli potentially.