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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2011, Article ID 626589, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/626589
Research Article

Nanospider Technology for the Production of Nylon-6 Nanofibers for Biomedical Applications

1Petrochemical Research Chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
2Polymer Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527, Egypt
3Department of Botany, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture (Saba Basha), Alexandria University, Alexandria 21513, Egypt

Received 4 December 2010; Accepted 15 February 2011

Academic Editor: Bohua Sun

Copyright © 2011 Mohamed H. El-Newehy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Nylon-6 nanofiber mat incorporated with 5,5-dimethyl hydantoin (DMH) as an antimicrobial drug was electrospun from formic acid. The morphology of the nanofiber mat using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that the obtained fiber had an average diameter of around 15–328 nm. The nanofiber was characterized by FTIR spectra, TGA, and DSC. The nanofiber containing drug showed initial fast release. It released about 55% of its drug content within the first two hours. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the electrospun nylon-6 nanofiber containing drug was examined against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus. The nylon-6 nanofiber exhibited high inhibitory effects against the microbes. The results clearly indicate that the antimicrobial activity of the electrospun nylon-6 nanofiber containing drug varies with the species of the organisms used. Thus, the study ascertains the value of the use of electrospun nanofiber, which could be of considerable interest to the development of new antimicrobial materials. The microbes, examined by SEM, were totally deformed and exhibited severe destruction. Abnormal cell division was observed at high frequencies among cells that tried to divide in the presence of the nanofiber. Many cells were enlarged, elongated, empty ghosts, or fragmented, consistent with the extremely low viability.