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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 750813, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/750813
Research Article

Infrared-Mediated Drug Elution Activity of Gold Nanorod-Grafted TiO2 Nanotubes

1Department of Dental Biomaterials and Institute of Biomaterial and Implant, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, 344-2 Shinyong dong, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749, Republic of Korea
2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093, USA

Received 26 May 2014; Accepted 16 July 2014; Published 24 July 2014

Academic Editor: Young-Bum Park

Copyright © 2014 Kyung-Suk Moon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to prepare gold nanorod- (GNR-) grafted TiO2 nanotubes by thiolactic acid treatment and evaluate remote-controlled drug elution and antibacterial activity by infrared (IR) light irradiation. Tetracycline used as an antibiotic was loaded into GNR-grafted TiO2 nanotubes by using 2 w/v% polylactic acid solutions. A near-IR laser (830 nm) was used for remote-controlled IR light irradiation. Results of SEM, TEM, XRD, and EDX revealed that GNR chemically bonded to the whole surface of the TiO2 nanotubes. An antibiotic release test revealed that on-off drug elution was triggered effectively by the photothermal effect of GNR grafted on TiO2 nanotubes. Furthermore, an antibacterial agar zone test indicated that the annihilated zone of Streptococcus mutans in the experimental group with IR light irradiation was significantly larger than that of the corresponding group without IR light irradiation ( ). Therefore, GNR-grafted TiO2 nanotubes would be expected to extend the limited usage of TiO2, which show photocatalytic activity only within the ultraviolet (UV) to IR region, thereby allowing the development of novel fusion technologies in the field of implant materials.