Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
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Acceptance rate16%
Submission to final decision105 days
Acceptance to publication24 days
CiteScore3.900
Journal Citation Indicator0.490
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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism publishes original research articles and review articles covering the broad and multidisciplinary field of human nutrition and metabolism.

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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame) Intake Ameliorates High-Fat Diet-Induced Glucose Intolerance via Promoting GLUT4 Expression and Membrane Translocation in Muscle

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a lifestyle-related disease, is developed due to eating habits and decreased physical activity. Diabetes also increases the risk of cancer and major neurodegenerative diseases; controlling the onset of diabetes helps prevent various illnesses. Eating seaweed, such as Undaria pinnatifida (wakame), is a part of the Asian food culture. Therefore, we analyzed the antidiabetic effect of wakame intake using the high-fat diet-induced diabetes mouse model. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of wakame extract on the cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) and activation of insulin signal molecules, such as AKT and AMPK, in insulin-sensitive tissues. Differentiated C2C12 cells were incubated with wakame components. The membrane translocation of GLUT4 and phosphorylation of AKT and AMPK were investigated with immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting, respectively. Also, male C57BL/6J mice were fed the normal diet (ND), high-fat diet (HFD), ND with 1% wakame powder (ND + W), or HFD with 1% wakame powder (HFD + W). We evaluated the effect of wakame intake on high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance using an oral glucose tolerance test. Moreover, we analyzed insulin signaling molecules, such as GLUT4, AKT, and AMPK, in muscle using Western blotting. GLUT4 membrane translocation was promoted by wakame components. Also, GLUT4 levels and AKT and AMPK phosphorylation were significantly elevated by wakame components in C2C12 cells. In addition, the area under the curve (AUC) of the HFD + W group was significantly smaller than that of the HFD group. Furthermore, the level of GLUT4 in the muscle was increased in the wakame intake group. This study revealed that various wakame components exerted antidiabetic effects on the mice on a high-fat diet by promoting glucose uptake in the skeletal muscle, enhancing GLUT4 levels, and activating AKT and AMPK.

Research Article

Iodine Concentration in Brazilian Drinking Water and Its Possible Contribution to Iodine Intake for Different Physiological Groups

Objective. The objective is to analyze the concentration of iodine in Brazilian drinking water and its possible contribution to iodine intake for different groups. Methods. Water samples collected from primary healthcare units in eight locations distributed across all five macroregions of Brazil were analyzed. The quantification of iodine in the water samples was done by spectrophotometry (leuco crystal violet method). To classify the degree of iodine concentration, the recommendation of the Ministry of Health (China) was followed since Brazil lacks a classification standard. To verify the possible contribution of drinking water to iodine intake for different groups, the recommended water intake for each group according to the United States Institute of Medicine (2004) was considered. The percentage of iodine in drinking water and its contribution to iodine intake for different physiological groups were calculated based on the estimated average requirement (EAR) of iodine. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 21.0 and Statistical Analysis Systems (SAS) version 9.2. Results. Significant differences were found between the maximum and minimum concentrations of iodine in water samples from the same location. In Pinhais (south region), the difference was 44.32 μg⋅ L−1; in Viçosa (southeast region), it was 27.86 μg·L−1; in Rondonópolis (midwest region), it was 12.66 μg·L−1; in São Luís (northeast region), it was 11.82 μg·L−1; in Brasilian Federal District (midwest region), it was 10.98 μg·L−1; in Macaé (southeast region), it was 10.14 μg⋅ L−1; in Palmas (north region), it was 4.22 μg·L−1; and in Vitória (southeast region), it was 1.69 μg·L−1. The maximum concentrations of iodine found in the drinking water of Pinhais and Viçosa can contribute more than 70.0% and 50.0%, respectively, to daily iodine intake for all groups. Conclusion. Monitoring the concentration of iodine in drinking water from different locations in each city or Federal District is a preventive measure against inadequate iodine intake and possible adverse changes in population health.

Research Article

Protective Effect of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) and Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training (MICT) against Vascular Dysfunction in Hyperglycemic Rats

Background. Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with the inability of endothelial cells to maintain homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Regular exercise may be considered as an effective and low-cost nonpharmacological tool for improving vascular function, though there is no agreement on the best type of exercise. Objectives. To determine how high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) may prevent endothelial dysfunction under hyperglycemic conditions, and to compare these two interventions. Method. Twenty-four eight-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups: healthy nonexercising control (C), hyperglycemic control (HG-C), hyperglycemic + HIIT (HG-IT), and hyperglycemic + MICT (HG-CT). Hyperglycemia was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin. Hyperglycemic animals were subjected to HIIT or MICT protocols six days a week for six weeks. Decapitation was performed the day after the exercise protocols were completed. The ascending aorta (until the abdominal artery) was examined. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the glucagon-likepeptide-1 (GLP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels. A colorimetric assay was used to measure superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used to histologically analyze the aortas. Results. There was a significantly higher level of GLP-1 and lower expression of RAGE, NF-κB, and TNFα in the HG-IT and HG-CT group compared to the HG-C group. Microscopic examination of aortic tissue showed a better tissue arrangement in both treatment groups than in the HG-C group. Except for the MDA level, there were no significant differences in any of the measured parameters between the HG-IT and HG-CT groups. Conclusion. Under hyperglycemic conditions, both HIIT and MICT have a protective role against endothelial dysfunction.

Research Article

A Study to Improve the Vitamin A and Iodine Status of Pregnant Women through a Multiple Micronutrient Fortified Salt

Background. To study the efficacy of a multiple micronutrient fortified salt enriched with iron, iodine, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, niacin, and folic acid in improving serum retinol and iodine status of pregnant women. Methods. It was a randomized control trial in the antenatal clinic of a hospital. 151 women in the experimental group received a multiple micronutrient fortified salt to cook all their meals, and 150 women in the control group did not receive the fortified salt. Blood was collected in the three trimesters. Urine was collected in their first and third trimesters. Serum retinol, CRP (C-reactive protein), and AGP (Alpha glycoprotein) in blood were assessed, and iodine was assessed in urine. All the women were dewormed once. Results. The inflammation adjusted mean serum retinol in three trimesters in the experimental group was 24.51, 27.29, and 25.68 µg/dL, and it was 28.97, 27.63, and 22.72 µg/dL in the control group. Over the study period of 6 months, the increase in serum retinol in the experimental group was 1.17 µg/dL whereas in the control group serum retinol decreased by 6.25 µg/dL. The experimental group increase in serum retinol is significantly more () than the changes in retinol in the control group. The prevalence of serum retinol deficiency in the three trimesters was 39.1%,25.8%, and 37.7% in the experimental group and 14%, 22.7%, and 39.3% in the control group, and the change in the experimental group was significant () compared to the control group by binary logistic regression. Over the study period of 6 months there is a significant increase in urinary iodine concentration in the experimental group (), showing absorption of iodine from the fortified salt whereas there is a significant decline in the iodine values in the control group (). At the end of the study, the urinary iodine concentration of the experimental group was significantly more () than that of the control group. Conclusion. The fortified salt was able to improve serum retinol levels and urinary iodine levels in pregnant women. Trial Registration. This trial was registered retrospectively on 19/02/2022 in the ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN17782574.

Research Article

Association between Copeptin and Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review

Background. Copeptin, a reliable marker for vasopressin release, has been associated with cardiometabolic diseases including metabolic syndrome (MetS). This systematic review aims to evaluate the association between copeptin and MetS. Methods. We searched in Pubmed, Scopus, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases until March 2021 and included observational studies (cohort studies, cross-sectional, and case-control) reporting the risk or prevalence of having MetS in patients with elevated copeptin levels compared to patients without elevated copeptin levels. The risk of bias was evaluated with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Meta-analysis was not performed because of the heterogeneity of the copeptin cut-off values. Results. A total of 7 studies (5 cross-sectional, 1 case-control, and 1 cohort) were included comprising 11,699 participants. Most of them were performed in the adult general population. Two cross-sectional and one case-control studies found a positive significant association between higher levels of copeptin and MetS. While three cross-sectional and one cohort studies found no association. The case-control study had several methodological limitations, most cross-sectional studies were methodologically adequate and the cohort study had no methodological issues. Conclusions. The association between copeptin and MetS is inconsistent. However, the arginine-vasopressin system impairment contributes to metabolic disorders, expressing plasma copeptin changes. Thus, more longitudinal studies are required to corroborate the association of copeptin and MetS.

Research Article

A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study about the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Food Safety Measures among Rural Households in Bangladesh

Background. Food handlers have been found to play essential roles in transmitting foodborne diseases and can pose a significant public health problem. Our study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of food safety measures among the rural households of Bangladesh. Materials and Methods. We conducted this community-based cross-sectional study among women above 18 years involved with food preparation in rural households of four villages in Bangladesh. A total of 400 respondents were selected using the multistage cluster sampling technique. Data were collected using pretested and predesigned questionnaires based on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) five keys for food safety. We used Stata (Version 16) for all statistical analyses. Results. The mean age of the participants was 42.09 ± 12.96 years. The median KAP scores [interquartile range (IQR)] were 7 (21–10), 16 (5–18), and 26 (9–30), respectively. We found the median KAP scores were significantly lower in the age group >55 years than in age groups of 18–25, 26–35, 36–45, and 46–55 years ( for all). In addition, the median KAP scores were significantly higher in respondents who were married, literate, employed/active, living in pakka/semipakka house, and with a monthly family income of >5,000 BDT ( for all). Among all, 33.75%, 80.25%, and 69.00% had good (≥80% of total) KAP scores, respectively. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that monthly family income >5,000 BDT was a significant predictor of good knowledge [Adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR): 3.51, 95%CI: 1.55–7.98], good attitude (aOR: 5.82, 95%CI: 2.80–11.70), and good practice (aOR: 3.18, 95%CI: 1.67–6.07). Age >55 years was a significant predictor of good attitude (aOR: 0.38, 95%CI: 0.17–0.81) and good practice (aOR: 0.48, 95%CI: 0.21–0.89). Having ≤4 members in the family was a significant predictor of good practice (aOR: 1.85, 95%CI: 1.13–3.03) regarding food safety measures. Conclusion. The study found that KAP among rural Bangladeshi women regarding food safety were relatively satisfactory. However, having a poor monthly income and living in a large family were impediments to good food-safety practices where work can be done. The findings of this study may help develop health intervention programs for food handlers to further improve KAP toward food safety, thereby reducing foodborne illness in households.

Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate16%
Submission to final decision105 days
Acceptance to publication24 days
CiteScore3.900
Journal Citation Indicator0.490
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.