Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
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Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision119 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore5.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.480
Impact Factor2.2

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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism has recently been accepted into Food Science and Technology Abstracts.

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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism publishes original research articles and review articles covering the broad and multidisciplinary field of human nutrition and metabolism.

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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Anthropometric and Biochemical Correlations of Insulin Resistance in a Middle-Aged Maltese Caucasian Population

Background. Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, and with increased all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality. A number of surrogate markers are used in clinical practice to diagnose IR. The aim of this study was to investigate the discriminatory power of a number of routinely available anthropometric and biochemical variables in predicting IR and to determine their optimal cutoffs. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study in a cohort of middle-aged individuals. We used receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analyses in order to determine the discriminatory power of parameters of interest in detecting IR, which was defined as homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance ≥2.5. Results. Both the lipid accumulation product (LAP) and visceral adiposity index (VAI) exhibited good discriminatory power to detect IR in both males and females. The optimal cutoffs were 42.5 and 1.44, respectively, in males and 36.2 and 1.41, respectively, in females. Serum triglycerides (TG) and waist circumference (WC) similarly demonstrated good discriminatory power in detecting IR in both sexes. The optimal cutoffs for serum TG and WC were 1.35 mmol/L and 96.5 cm, respectively, in men and 1.33 mmol/L and 82 cm, respectively, in women. On the other hand, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, liver transaminases, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, serum uric acid, ferritin, waist-hip ratio, “A” body shape, thigh circumference, and weight-adjusted thigh circumference all had poor discriminatory power. Conclusions. Our data show that LAP, VAI, TG, and WC all have good discriminatory power in detecting IR in both men and women. The optimal cutoffs for TG and WC were lower than those currently recommended in both sexes. Replication studies are required in different subpopulations and different ethnicities in order to be able to update the current cut points to ones which reflect the contemporary population as well as to evaluate their longitudinal relationship with longer-term cardiometabolic outcomes.

Research Article

Efficacy of Hot Tea Infusion vs. Ethanolic Extract of Moringa oleifera for the Simultaneous Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver, Hyperlipidemia, and Hyperglycemia in a Murine Model Fed with a High-Fat Diet

Moringa oleifera (MO) is a native tree of Asia and is cultivated in some areas of Mexico as part of traditional horticulture. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of MO infusion vs. MO ethanolic extract for the simultaneous treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD), hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia in a murine model fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). BALB/c mice were fed a balanced diet (healthy control) or an HFD for 6 months. With this, the NAFLD model was established before starting a therapeutic intervention with MO for two months. The phytochemical analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance in 1H and 13C experiments showed signals for pyrrole alkaloids and triterpenes as the main constituents of the extract and infusion preparation. A significant reduction of SGPT, SGOT, lipids, urea, and glucose in blood among NAFLD groups treated with MO (infusion or extract) was found, when compared to the NAFLD-placebo group. Steatosis and liver inflammation were found to be decreased in the MO groups, as infusion or ethanolic extract. Infusion produced a better therapeutic effect than the extract in all parameters, except glycemic control, where the extract was better. As an additional finding, it is noteworthy that treatment with MO, particularly through infusion, resulted in improved motor activity. Moreover, a reduction in anxiety-like behavior was observed exclusively with the administration of infusion. These observations provide valuable insights into the potential broader effects of Moringa oleifera beyond the primary aim of the study.

Research Article

Associations between Components of Metabolic Syndrome and Demographic, Nutritional, and Lifestyle Factors

Objectives. To evaluate the associations between individuals with and without changes in components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and demographic, nutritional, and lifestyle factors. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 224 individuals followed-up at a public hospital in Northeast Brazil. We used National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP) criteria to diagnose MetS. We assessed components of MetS as dependent variables, while sex, age, food consumption, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, anthropometric parameters, and sleep hours were independent variables. Results. Comparing individuals with and without changes in components of MetS, the logistic regression models revealed that female sex was predictive of increased waist circumference and low HDL-c levels while advanced age was predictive of increased blood pressure and blood glucose levels. BMI emerged as a predictor for waist circumference and a protective factor for triglyceride levels. In addition, potassium intake, physical activity, and sleep duration were protective against decreased HDL-c, elevated triglyceride, and elevated blood pressure levels, respectively. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that sex, age, BMI, dietary potassium intake, physical activity, and hours of sleep are factors to be targeted in public health actions for prevention and treatment of MetS.

Research Article

The Effectiveness of Modified Atkins Ketogenic Diet on Children with Intractable Epilepsy: A Pilot Study from Indonesia

Background. The ketogenic diet has recently been explored as a potential treatment approach for intractable epilepsy in children and has been applied in various parts of the world. The ketogenic diet is also effective for the treatment of mood disorders, especially for adolescent and young adults with epilepsy. The Modified Atkins Diet (MAD) is the less restrictive type of ketogenic diet with similar principles as the classic type. However, no study has been conducted to evaluate the use of MAD in children with severe epilepsy in Indonesia. This study aims to assess the effectiveness, tolerance, compliance, and the adverse effects of MAD in children with intractable epilepsy during a 6-month monitoring period. Methods. This is a pilot experimental study involving children aged 2–18 years old with intractable epilepsy at the Pediatric Neurology and the Pediatric Nutrition & Metabolic Diseases Clinics at the Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta between November 2021 and June 2022. Results. A total of 31 subjects met the inclusion criteria and received the MAD in the first month, followed by 13 (41.9%) subjects in the third month, and 9 (29%) subjects in the sixth month. The MAD reduced the seizure frequency by 50% (), 62% (), and 83.3% () in the first, third, and sixth months, respectively. The most frequent adverse effects are vomiting and diarrhea. Noncompliance was observed in 18 (58.1%) subjects. A sample of the MAD food menu guidebook was developed to make it easier for parents to adhere to the diet. Conclusions. The MAD reduces the mean seizure frequency in children with intractable epilepsy in the first, third, and sixth months, with a statistical significance in the sixth month. A further randomized, controlled, and multicenter clinical trial with a larger sample size and longer observation period is required. This trial is registered with Protocol ID 20-10-1323.

Research Article

Comparison of Answers between ChatGPT and Human Dieticians to Common Nutrition Questions

Background. More people than ever seek nutrition information from online sources. The chatbot ChatGPT has seen staggering popularity since its inception and may become a resource for information in nutrition. However, the adequacy of ChatGPT to answer questions in the field of nutrition has not been investigated. Thus, the aim of this research was to investigate the competency of ChatGPT in answering common nutrition questions. Methods. Dieticians were asked to provide their most commonly asked nutrition questions and their own answers to them. We then asked the same questions to ChatGPT and sent both sets of answers to other dieticians (N = 18) or nutritionists and experts in the domain of each question (N = 9) to be graded based on scientific correctness, actionability, and comprehensibility. The grades were also averaged to give an overall score, and group means of the answers to each question were compared using permutation tests. Results. The overall grades for ChatGPT were higher than those from the dieticians for the overall scores in five of the eight questions we received. ChatGPT also had higher grades on five occasions for scientific correctness, four for actionability, and five for comprehensibility. In contrast, none of the answers from the dieticians had a higher average score than ChatGPT for any of the questions, both overall and for each of the grading components. Conclusions. Our results suggest that ChatGPT can be used to answer nutrition questions that are frequently asked to dieticians and provide encouraging support for the role of chatbots in offering nutrition support.

Research Article

Novel Anthropometric Indices as Screening Tools for Obesity: A Study on Healthy Iranians

Background and Aims. Upper body fat distribution is more related to cardiometabolic diseases than central obesity. Neck circumference (NC) and neck-to-height ratio (NHtR) are two indicators of upper body obesity that are affordable, easy to obtain, highly reproducible, and more practical in the crowded health centers than the classic anthropometric indices. Methods. 18–65-year-old individuals with no past medical history were included. After obtaining written informed consent, they were screened for hypertension, high blood glucose, and other abnormal laboratory results. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Mann–Whitney U test, Chi square test, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, and ROC curve. Results. In our 2,812 participants, NC had the lowest area under the curve (AUC) in both male and female obese and overweight subjects. NHtR and hip circumference (HC) had the highest AUC in men and women with obesity, respectively. The highest sensitivity for overweight men and women belonged to waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), respectively, and for both males and females with obesity, NHtR had the highest sensitivity. The cutoff point of NHtR had the same value for males and females. HC and NHtR had the highest positive likelihood ratio (PLR) for obesity in men. In addition, HC and WC had the highest PLR for obesity in women. Conclusion. In this study, we revealed that NC had the lowest and NHtR and HC had the highest predictive value for obesity. Furthermore, for both males and females with obesity, NHtR had the highest sensitivity. HC had the highest PLR for obesity in both genders. Our results warrant prospective studies to evaluate the role of NHtR and other novel anthropometric indices in the risk of cardiometabolic diseases.

Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision119 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore5.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.480
Impact Factor2.2
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