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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2010, Article ID 196476, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/196476
Research Article

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Trends in US Adolescents and Their Association with Insulin Resistance-Related Parameters

1Department of Pediatrics, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
2Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642, USA

Received 28 May 2009; Accepted 24 July 2009

Academic Editor: Maria Luz Fernandez

Copyright © 2010 Andrew A. Bremer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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