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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2010, Article ID 905612, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/905612
Review Article

Interaction among Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Energy Systems during Intense Exercise

1Health and Exercise Science Research Laboratory, School of Science, University of the West of Scotland, Hamilton Campus, Almada Street, Hamilton ML3 0JB, UK
2School of Human Movement Studies, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW 2795, Australia

Received 15 July 2010; Revised 5 October 2010; Accepted 7 October 2010

Academic Editor: Michael M. Müller

Copyright © 2010 Julien S. Baker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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