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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2010, Article ID 930757, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/930757
Research Article

The Relation of Coffee Consumption to Serum Uric Acid in Japanese Men and Women Aged 49–76 Years

1Department of Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
3Department of Medicine and Bio-Regulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan

Received 6 February 2010; Revised 1 June 2010; Accepted 24 June 2010

Academic Editor: Duo Li

Copyright © 2010 Ngoc Minh Pham et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Few studies have suggested an inverse relation between coffee intake and serum concentrations of uric acid (UA), but none has addressed the relation in men and women separately. We examined the relation between coffee intake and serum UA levels in free-living middle-aged and elderly men and women in Fukuoka, Japan. Methods. Study subjects were derived from the baseline survey of a cohort study on lifestyle-related diseases, and included 11.662 men and women aged 49–76 years; excluded were those with medication for gout and hyperuricemia, use of diuretic drugs, and medical care for cancer or chronic kidney disease. Statistical adjustment was made for body mass index, alcohol use, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and other factors. Results. There were inverse associations of coffee consumption with serum UA concentrations and hyperuricemia in men regardless of adjustment for covariates. Women showed a statistically significant, but weaker, inverse association between coffee and serum UA levels after allowance for the confounding factors. Conclusion. The findings add to evidence for a protective association between coffee intake and hyperuricemia.