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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2011, Article ID 676208, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/676208
Review Article

Dietary Exercise as a Novel Strategy for the Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome: Effects on Skeletal Muscle Function

1Laboratory of Health Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto 606-8522, Japan
2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566, Japan

Received 5 January 2011; Revised 29 March 2011; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editor: Maurizio Muscaritoli

Copyright © 2011 Wataru Aoi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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